Mathlinks 8


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Game BLMs

Interested in playing the Math Games in MathLinks 8? Click on the links below to download the game boards and other pieces you need to play the games in Chapters 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12.


Chapter 1
Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper (455.0K)
Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper (98.0K)
Master 9 0.5 Centimetre Grid Paper (739.0K)
Master 9 0.5 Centimetre Grid Paper (149.0K)

Chapter 4
BLM 4–16 Number Match Cards (59.0K)
BLM 4–16 Number Match Cards (29.0K)

Chapter 6
BLM 6–23 Spinner (284.0K)
BLM 6–23 Spinner (58.0K)
BLM 6–24 Fabulous Fractions Multiplication Sheet (243.0K)
BLM 6–24 Fabulous Fractions Multiplication Sheet (82.0K)
BLM 6–25 Fabulous Fractions Division Sheet (236.0K)
BLM 6–25 Fabulous Fractions Division Sheet (81.0K)

Chapter 8
Master 11 Hundred Chart (465.0K)
Master 11 Hundred Chart (97.0K)

Chapter 9
BLM 9–12 Friends and Relations Spinner (392.0K)
BLM 9–12 Friends and Relations Spinner (61.0K)
BLM 9–13 Friends and Relations Game Cards (35.0K)
BLM 9–13 Friends and Relations Game Cards (36.0K)
BLM 9–14 Friends and Relations Record Sheet (41.0K)
BLM 9–14 Friends and Relations Record Sheet (35.0K)

Chapter 10
Master 15 Algebra Tiles (34.0K)
Master 15 Algebra Tiles (42.0K)

Chapter 12
BLM 12–20 Playing at Tiling Game Board #1 (539.0K)
BLM 12–20 Playing at Tiling Game Board #1 (86.0K)
BLM 12–21 Playing at Tiling Game Board #2 (564.0K)
BLM 12–21 Playing at Tiling Game Board #2 (70.0K)
BLM 12–22 Playing at Tiling Game Board #3 (404.0K)
BLM 12–22 Playing at Tiling Game Board #3 (76.0K)




General Web Links


CHAPTER 4

Mrs. Glosser’s Math GoodiesTM: Percent


http://www.mathgoodies.com/lessons/vol4/meaning_percent.html

Need some practice with percents? This site reviews the meaning of percent, provides worked examples, and then allows you to test your skills with an interactive quiz.
( http://www.mathgoodies.com/lessons/vol4/meaning_percent.html )
CHAPTER 5,7

Geometry Step-by-Step From the Land of the Incas


http://agutie.homestead.com/files/index.html

This site offers geometry problems, proofs, quizzes, puzzles, illustrations, and historical references from South American Inca culture, including Cuzco, Machu Picchu, the Nazca Lines, the Quipu, Caral, and an Incan city on Mars.
( http://agutie.homestead.com/files/index.html )
CHAPTER 6

Pattern Blocks: Exploring Fractions With Shapes


http://www.arcytech.org/java/patterns/patterns_j.shtml

This site features an interactive applet using pattern blocks to investigate fractions and fractional relationships. Instructions can be read online or printed.
( http://www.arcytech.org/java/patterns/patterns_j.shtml )
CHAPTER 8

FunBrain Line Jumper


http://www.funbrain.com/linejump/index.html

Practise adding and subtracting integers using a number line. This site includes problems at five different levels from easy to super brain. Immediate feedback is provided for each question.
( http://www.funbrain.com/linejump/index.html )
CHAPTER 9

Mathlets: Graphing Functions


http://cs.jsu.edu/mcis/faculty/leathrum/Mathlets/grapher.html

This interactive site allows you to practise graphing up to five relations simultaneously. Graphs and linear relations are colour-coded to make comparisons easy.
( http://cs.jsu.edu/mcis/faculty/leathrum/Mathlets/grapher.html )
CHAPTER 10

Equation Match


http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/mathsfile/shockwave/games/equationmatch.html

The game Equation Match requires you to find matching pairs of equations by solving for x in each equation. As each pair is correctly matched, a hidden picture is gradually revealed. The game has three levels of difficulty.
( http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/mathsfile/shockwave/games/equationmatch.html )
CHAPTER 11

Interactivate: Experimental Probability


http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/ExpProbability/?version=1.6.0_03&browser=M...

This interactive site allows you to experiment with various random number generators, such as spinners and number cubes, and tally results. You can even generate your own number cubes to use in simulations.
( http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/ExpProbability/?version=1.6.0_03&browser=M... )
CHAPTER 12

Interactive Transformations


http://www.mathsnet.net/transform/

This site includes interactive applets that allow you to explore translations, rotations, reflections, translations, and combinations of these transformations. Also included are interactive problems and explanations.
( http://www.mathsnet.net/transform/ )
Investigating Tessellations Using Activity Pattern Blocks

http://mathforum.org/sum95/suzanne/active.html

This site offers activities and applets for investigating tessellations using pattern blocks. Tutorials, activities, and information on tessellations and tiling are included.
( http://mathforum.org/sum95/suzanne/active.html )
Others (Not Sorted by Chapters)

British Columbia Ministry of Education


http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/students_ps.htm

The British Columbia Ministry of Education site provides information about programs and services for students in British Columbia.
( http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/students_ps.htm )
Alberta Education

http://ednet.edc.gov.ab.ca/students/

The Alberta Education site provides information about programs and services for students in Alberta.
( http://ednet.edc.gov.ab.ca/students/ )
Yukon Education

http://www.education.gov.yk.ca/

The Yukon Department of Education site provides information about education in the Yukon.
( http://www.education.gov.yk.ca/ )
Northwest Territories Education, Culture and Employment

http://www.ece.gov.nt.ca/

The Northwest Territories Department of Education, Culture and Employment site provides information about education for kindergarten to grade 12 in the Northwest Territories.
( http://www.ece.gov.nt.ca/ )
Math Central

http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/

This site provides resources for students including a glossary, a question-and-answer forum, information about different careers in mathematics, and a mathematical problem of the month.
( http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/ )
On-line Mathematics Dictionary

http://pax.st.usm.edu/cmi/inform_html/glossary.html

The mathematics dictionary provides definitions of mathematical terms. Although it is a work in progress, there are many definitions arranged alphabetically, with hyperlinks for each letter of the alphabet.
( http://pax.st.usm.edu/cmi/inform_html/glossary.html )
Mathematics Glossary

http://www.ronblond.com/MathGlossary/

This site offers a glossary of mathematical terms organized by grade level. You can also access interactive applets geared to your mathematics program.
( http://www.ronblond.com/MathGlossary/ )
The Math Forum @ Drexel

http://mathforum.org/

This site from Drexel University (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) provides mathematical resources, including discussion groups, problems of the week, innovations, and a popular Ask Dr. Math question-and-answer forum.
( http://mathforum.org/ )
Mudd Math Fun Facts

http://www.math.hmc.edu/funfacts/

This site offers interesting mathematical facts. Each Math Fun Fact is a math puzzle or article about a mathematical idea. The facts are organized by topic (e.g., algebra, geometry, probability). A feature called Today’s Most Popular Fun Facts is also included.
( http://www.math.hmc.edu/funfacts/ )
Mathematics Lessons that are fun! fun! fun!

http://math.rice.edu/~lanius/Lessons/

This site offers mathematics lessons developed by Cynthia Lanius of Rice University (Houston, Texas). Try out some of the interactive applets, which are fun.
( http://math.rice.edu/~lanius/Lessons/ )
Figure This! Math Challenges for Families

http://www.figurethis.org/index.html

This National Council of Teachers of Mathematics site offers many interesting mathematical challenges. You can select challenges by title by clicking on Challenge Index, or by topic by clicking on Math Index.
( http://www.figurethis.org/index.html )
Coolmath 4 Kids.com

http://www.coolmath4kids.com/

This site includes interactive math lessons, problems, a math dictionary, and games, puzzles, and other interesting activities. Note that this site is commercially sponsored, and therefore includes advertising banners.
( http://www.coolmath4kids.com/ )
Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles

http://www.cut-the-knot.org/content.shtml

This site includes interactive applets for games and puzzles. Click on Math Games and Puzzles.
( http://www.cut-the-knot.org/content.shtml )
Indexes of Biographies

http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BiogIndex.html

This site offers biographies including visuals of famous mathematicians. There is a link to female mathematicians. Also available are birthplace maps, timelines, and a feature called Mathematicians of the day, for any date.
( http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BiogIndex.html )
Mathematicians of the African Diaspora

http://www.math.buffalo.edu/mad/madgreatest.html

This site highlights Black mathematicians from Africa, North America, Asia, and Europe.
( http://www.math.buffalo.edu/mad/madgreatest.html )
Mathematics Advancements by Muslims

http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/schwww/sch618/ScienceMath/Math.html

This site highlights Muslim mathematicians.
( http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/schwww/sch618/ScienceMath/Math.html )
Index of Ancient Indian Mathematics

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Indexes/Indians.html

This site highlights ancient East Indian mathematicians.
( http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Indexes/Indians.html )
History of Mathematics: Mathematics in China

http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/mathhist/china.html

This site highlights the history of Chinese mathematics and Chinese mathematicians.
( http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/mathhist/china.html )
Math.com: Homework Help

http://www.math.com/students/homeworkhelp.html

Need some help with your homework? This site offers lessons, worked examples, interactive practice problems, and quizzes organized by topic (e.g., pre-algebra, algebra, geometry). Click on a subtopic of your choice.
( http://www.math.com/students/homeworkhelp.html )
Fermi Questions

http://mathforum.org/workshops/sum96/interdisc/sheila1.html

This site in cooperation with the Math Forum provides Fermi questions, which stress estimation, numerical reasoning, and communicating in mathematics. Fermi questions encourage multiple approaches to solving problems. This site includes a biography of Enrico Fermi and a library of Fermi questions with solutions and a list of other Fermi questions.
( http://mathforum.org/workshops/sum96/interdisc/sheila1.html )
Career Profiles

http://www.maa.org/careers/index.html

The Mathematical Association of America site provides links to career profiles of people who use mathematics in their job every day. Included are short biographies, educational qualifications, and practical applications of mathematics.
( http://www.maa.org/careers/index.html )


Math is Fun

http://www.mathisfun.com/

This site includes games, puzzles, quizzes, worksheets, and a variety of other math-related activities.
( http://www.mathisfun.com/ )
MATHguide

http://www.mathguide.com/

The Math Guide contains several resources for students, including a virtual scientific and graphing calculator, project ideas, and math puzzles.
( http://www.mathguide.com/ )
Mathematics for Students and Teachers

http://camel.math.ca/Education/

The Canadian Mathematical Society site offers links to student resources on math–related topics.
( http://camel.math.ca/Education/ )

How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement

http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/

If you need information about a specific unit of measurement or unit conversion, visit this site. The site includes information about the international system (SI), the metric system, the English customary system, and relatively unknown measurement systems.
( http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/ )

Getting Started with TI-83 Plus/TI-84 Plus

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/449925/mhr_ml7_tr_TI_Icon.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (48.0K)</a>
These lessons provided by Texas Instruments will focus on introducing you to the TI-83 Plus and TI-84 Plus through various guided interactive activities.


These lessons are provided through Texas Instruments, and as such do not necessarily follow the Western and Northern Canadian Protocol The Common Curriculum Framework for Grades K–9 Mathematics. The following lessons and activities align with our curriculum and standards and we hope you take the time to enjoy the module and take from it what you feel will apply in your classroom setting.

Module 4: Draw on Your Knowledge of Coordinates
This module will examine the following:
• using graph window presets such as zstandard, zdecimal, zinterger, to create friendly viewing windows
• manually changing the window settings to create friendly viewing graph windows and manually setting the centre of a window
• graphing lines squares, circles using tools from the draw menu and clearing drawings
• drawing on the graph screen using the draw tools from the home screen and storing/recalling drawings
• downloading and using TI Connect to capture drawings on the home screen

Module 5: Transformations
This module will examine the following:
• using the set up editor and the alpha lock feature to name and create lists
• using graph window presets such as zoomstat and zsquare to create friendly viewing windows and manually changing window settings
• performing operations on lists to reflect, translate and dilate graphs
• using the augment and dim commands to change the size of lists

Module 8: Solving Equations
This module will examine the following:
• using the guess-and-test method to solve equations
• entering expressions and using concatenation on home screen to solve expressions
• entering functions using the y = editor and using the table feature to find missing values
• Solving Equations Algebraically store values and compare answers with expressions with rational numbers
• using y= editor to graphing and using the Calc menu to find intersection points
• expressing answers in fractional form

Module 17: Systems of Linear Equations
This module will examine the following:
• using home screen to guess and check solutions and to find the intersection point of two functions
• graphing functions and performing mathematical operations on functions in the y= editor
• entering matrices and finding a solution using the rref (row reduced echelon form) feature


To view these files, Adobe's free Flash Player application is required.


For additional support on this product and material please contact Texas Instruments.


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For more exciting TI-83 Plus and TI-84 Plus modules, please visit the Texas Instruments site.

http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/nonProductMulti/pd_onlinealgebra_free.html



If you have a TI-Navigator system, please visit the Texas Instruments site for supporting modules.


http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/nonProductMulti/pd_onlinemgnavigator_free.html


The TI website offers a wide range of free activities for classroom use. Go to www.education.ti.com and visit the Activities Exchange portal for more resources that are aligned to Canadian standards.




* TI-83 Plus and TI-84 Plus are a trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc.
** TI-Navigator is a trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc.




Getting Started with TI-Nspire

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These lessons provided by Texas Instruments will focus on introducing you to the TI-Nspire handheld by looking at the layout of the keypad and the key features of operating the Applications.

These lessons will focus on introducing you to the TI-Nspire handheld by looking at the layout of the keypad and the key features of operating the Applications.

Lesson 1
Familiarize yourself with the layout of the handheld keypad and how to navigate the various screens you will encounter.
Start this lesson

Lesson 2
Familiarize yourself with a few of the basics of the Graphs & Geometry application. You will learn how to graph and edit functions as well as edit the window settings using built-in zoom options.
Start this lesson

Lesson 3
The Basics of the Lists & Spreadsheet Application - Gain familiarity with all the basics of the Lists & Spreadsheet application. You will learn a variety of ways to enter values in to the spreadsheet.
Start this lesson

Lesson 4
Calculator, Notes, and the Document Model - Learn some basic features of the Notes application and Calculator application. The document model will also be discussed to help you see how the TI-Nspire can help students develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts through guided investigations.
Start this lesson


To view these files, Adobe's free Flash Player application is required.

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Check out these exciting Texas Instruments web links:


Current TI online TI-NspireTM courses:

http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/sectionHome/tutorials.html


Current TI Online courses:

http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/sectionHome/pd_onlinecourses_free.html


Current Product Tutorials:

http://education.ti.com/educationportal/sites/US/sectionHome/tutorials.html



* TI-Nspire is a trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc.




Glossary


Bar graph   A graph that uses horizontal or vertical bars to represent data visually.

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base of prism   Any face of a prism that reflects the general shape of the prism.
(See page(s) 246)
circle graph   A graph that represents data using sections of a circle. The sum of the percents in a circle graph is 100%.

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combined percents   Adding individual percents together.
commutative property   The order of adding or multiplying quantities does not affect the result.

a + b = b + a
a x b = b x a
constant   A number that does not change.
cylinder   A three-dimensional object with two parallel and congruent circular bases.

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(See page(s) 182)
distort   To change the appearance or twist the meaning of something in a way that is misleading.
distributive property   Multiplication of each term inside the brackets of an expression by the term outside the brackets:
a(b + c) = a x b + a x c
     = ab + ac
double bar graph   A graph that uses two sets of horizontal or vertical bars to compare two sets of data across categories.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_04.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (8.0K)</a>
double line graph   A graph that uses two lines to represent changes of two sets of data over time.

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edge   A line segment where two faces meet.

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equation   A mathematical statement with two expressions that have the same value. The two expressions are separated by an equal sign. 3a – 2 = 4 is an equation.
expression   Any single number, single variable, or combination of operations ( +, –, ×, ÷) involving numbers and variables. An expression does not include an equal sign. x + 9, 2y – 7, 8t, and 5 are expressions.
face   A flat or curved surface.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_07.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
favourable outcome   A successful result in a probability experiment.
formula   A mathematical statement that represents the relationship between specific quantities. An example is C = ?? × d, where C is the circumference and d is the diameter of a circle.
fractional percent  
A percent that includes a portion of a percent, such as <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_08.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> %, 0.42%, <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_09.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> %
<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_10.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 126)
height   The perpendicular distance from the base to the opposite side. Common symbol is h.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_11.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 246)
hypotenuse   The longest side of a right angle triangle. Opposite the right angle.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_12.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (2.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 89)
improper fraction  
A fraction in which the numerator is greater than the denominator. <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_13.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> is an improper fraction.

independent events   Results in which the outcome of one event has no effect on the outcome of another event.
integer   Any of the numbers ..., –3, –2, –1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...
(See page(s) 410)
interval   The spread between the smallest and the largest numbers in a range of numbers.
(See page(s) 6)
line graph   A graph that uses a line to represent changes in data over time.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_14.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (7.0K)</a>
linear equation   An equation that, when graphed, results in points that lie along a straight line.
(See page(s) 371)
linear relation   A pattern made by a set of points that lie in a straight line.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_15.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (4.0K)</a>
mixed number  
A number made up of a whole number and a fraction, such as <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_16.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> .

net   A two-dimensional figure, that, when folded, encloses a 3-D object.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_17.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (2.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 170)
numerical coefficient   A number that multiplies the variable. In 2x + 4, the number 2 is the numerical coefficient.
opposite operation   A mathematical operation that undoes another operation. Subtraction and addition are opposite operations; multiplication and division are opposite operations. Also called inverse operation.
order of operations   The correct sequence of steps for a calculation. Brackets first, then multiply and divide in order from left to right, and then add and subtract in order from left to right.
orientation   The different position of an object formed by translating, rotating, or reflecting the object.
(See page(s) 248)
part-to-part ratio   Compare different parts of a group to each other.
(See page(s) 48)
part-to-whole ratio  
Compare one part of a group to the whole group. Can be written as a : b or <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_18.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> .

(See page(s) 48)
percent  
Means out of 100 and is another way of saying hundredths. 30% means <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_19.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> or 0.30.
<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_20.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (4.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 122)
perfect square   A number that is the product of two identical factors. It has an even number of prime factors. 2 × 2 = 4 is a perfect square. 2 × 2 × 3 × 3 = 36, so 36 is a perfect square.
(See page(s) 82)
pictograph   A graph that illustrates data using pictures and symbols.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_21.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (6.0K)</a>
plane   A two-dimensional flat surface that extends in all directions.
prime factorization   A number written as the product of its prime factors. The prime factorization of 6 is 2 × 3.
(See page(s) 82)
probability   The likelihood or chance of an event occurring. Probability can be expressed as a ration, a fraction, or a percent.
(See page(s) 410)
proper fraction  
A fraction in which the denominator is greater than the numerator. <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_22.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> is a proper fraction.

proportion  
An equation that says that two ratios or two rates are equal. It can be written in fraction form as <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_23.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a>
or in ratio form as 1 : 4 = 4 : 16.

(See page(s) 64)
Pythagorean relationship   The relationship between the lengths of the sides of a right triangle. The sum of the areas of the squares attached to the legs of the triangle equals the area of the square attached to the hypotenuse.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_24.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (5.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 90)
rate   A comparison of two quantities measured in different units. $1.69 per 100 grams or $1.69/11 g is a rate for purchasing bulk food. 72 beats per minute or 72 beats/min is a heart rate.
(See page(s) 55)
reciprocal  
The multiplier or a number to give a product of 1. <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_25.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> is the reciprocal of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_13.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> because <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_26.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> .

(See page(s) 224)
rectangular prism   A prism whose bases are congruent rectangles.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_27.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (2.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 170)
right prism   A prism that has sides that are perpendicular to the bases of the prism.
sample space   All possible outcomes of a probability experiment.
(See page(s) 411)
sign rules   In division, the quotient of two integers with the same sign is positive, and with different signs is negative. In multiplication, the product of two integers with the same sign is positive, and with different signs is negative.
(See page(s) 294)
square root   A number that when multiplied by itself equals a given value. The symbol is <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_28.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> . 9 is the square root of 81 because 9 × 9 = 81.
(See page(s) 83)
surface area   The number of square units needed to cover a 3-D object. The sum of the areas of all the faces of an object.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_29.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (7.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 177)
table of values   A chart showing two sets of related numbers.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_30.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
tessellation   A pattern that covers an area or plane without overlapping or leaving gaps. Also called a tiling pattern.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_31.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (5.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 446)
three-term ratio   Compares three quantities measured in the same units. Can be written as a : b : c, or a to b to c.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_32.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (6.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 47)
tiling pattern   A pattern that covers an area or plane without overlapping or leaving gaps. Also called a tessellation.
(See page(s) 446)
tiling the plane   Using repeated congruent figures to cover an area without leaving gaps or overlapping.
(See page(s) 446)
transformation   A change in a figure that results in a different position or orientation. Examples are transformations, reflections, and rotations.
(See page(s) 452)
trend   The general direction in which a line graph is going.
triangular prism   A prism with two triangular faces that are the same size and shape.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_33.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 172)
two-term-ratio   Compares two quantities measured in the same units. Can be written as a : b or a to b.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_34.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (6.0K)</a>
(See page(s) 47)
unit price   A unit rate that involves prices. Often shown per 100 g or 100 mL. $5.00 per 100 g is a unit price.
(See page(s) 58)
unit rate   A rate in which the second term is 1. 64 beats/min is a unit rate.
(See page(s) 56)
variable   A letter that represents an unknown number. In 3a – 5, the variable is a.
vertex   The point where three or more edges of a figure meet. The plural is vertices.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_35.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (3.0K)</a>
volume   The amount of space an object occupies. Measured in cubic units.
(See page(s) 247)
zero pair   A pair of integer chips with one chip representing +1 and one chip representing –1. The pair represents zero because (+1) + (–1) = 0. Any whole number of zero pairs represents zero.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/mhr_ml8_glossary_36.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (1.0K)</a>

Project Ideas


Here are some interesting projects you might enjoy trying as you work through MathLinks 8. Do them alone or in a group.

To do some of these projects, you may wish to use the special paper that has been provided online. Also, there are Web Links to help you access necessary information.


Project Ideas

Representing Data (23.0K)
Number Relations (27.0K)
Pythagorean Relationship (21.0K)
Geometry of Three-Dimensional Figures (28.0K)
Probability (22.0K)
Tessellations (12.0K)


Master Sheets

Master 6 Square Dot Paper (29.0K)
Master 7 Isometric Dot Paper (18.0K)
Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper (25.0K)
Master 12 Percent Circles (26.0K)



Project Ideas Web Links

Representing Data Project #1 - Creating a circle graph using technology
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
Provides templates to create different types of graphs including circle graphs. Provides lots of options. Includes a tutorial.
( http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx )

Representing Data Project #1 - Creating a hand-drawn circle graph
Syracuse University Center for the Support of Teaching and Learning (CSTL)
Provides detailed instructions for constructing a hand-drawn circle graph. Illustrates using percent to create each sector.
( http://cstl.syr.edu/fipse/TabBar/BldCirc/BUILDCIR.HTM )

Representing Data Project #2 - Reading an electric or gas meter

http://www.utilitiesconsumeradvocate.gov.ab.ca/88.html
Government of Alberta
Explains how to read dial electric and gas meters in Alberta. Includes a link to using energy wisely.
( http://www.utilitiesconsumeradvocate.gov.ab.ca/88.html )

http://www.directenergy.com/EN/Texas/RES/Pages/CUS/HowToReadYourMeter.aspx
Direct Energy
Explains how to read a dial electric meter. Includes a link to reducing energy costs.
( http://www.directenergy.com/EN/Texas/RES/Pages/CUS/HowToReadYourMeter.aspx )

http://www.epcor.ca/en-ca/Customers/electricity-customers/MeterReading/Pages/ElectricMeterRead.aspx
EPCOR
Explains how to read different types of digital electric meters.
( http://www.epcor.ca/en-ca/Customers/electricity-customers/MeterReading/Pages/ElectricMeterRead.aspx )

Representing Data Projects #2 and #3 - How to choose which type of graph to use
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
Provides a tutorial about which types of graphs to use to display certain types of data.
( http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/help/user_guide/graph/whentouse.asp )

Number Relations Project #1 - The Golden Rectangle
About.com
Provides information about the Golden Rectangle and how to find it based on the golden ratio.
( http://altreligion.about.com/library/glossary/symbols/bldefsgoldenrectangle.htm )

Number Relations Project #1 - The Golden Section and the human body
Rasko Jovanovic’s World of Mathematics
Illustrates several examples of the Golden Section in the human body.
( http://milan.milanovic.org/math/english/golden/golden2.html )

Number Relations Project #3 - How to choose which type of graph to use
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
Provides a tutorial about which types of graphs to use to display certain types of data.
( http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/help/user_guide/graph/whentouse.asp )

Number Relations Project #3 - Benford’s Law
Millennium Mathematics Project
Discusses the occurrence of digits in lists of naturally occurring numbers. Features Benford’s Law.
( http://plus.maths.org/issue9/features/benford/ )

Number Relations Project #4 - The Swahili clock
MetaFilter Network
Provides background information about the Swahili clock.
( http://www.metafilter.com/69359/The-worlds-first-Swahili-clock )

Pythagorean Relationships Project #3 - Investigating the Pythagorean relationship
Janet Mae Zahumeny
Includes geometry software activities involving shapes other than squares to explore the Pythagorean relationship. Version 3 of The Geometer’s Sketchpad is needed for this activity.
( http://www.wpunj.edu/icip/itm/Lessonpl/sketch/pythag.html )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #1 - Interactive activity for changing the height and radius of a cylinder
Maris Technologies Ltd.
Provides an applet that allows users to change the height and radius of a cylinder and discover that for minimum surface area with a fixed volume, the height must be double the radius.
( http://www.maris.com/content/applets/math/SodaCanDemo.html )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #2 - Defines pyramid
Wise Geek
Defines pyramid.
( http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-pyramid.htm )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #2 - The rhomboidal pyramid called the Bent Pyramid at Dahshur

http://www.pyramidmatrix.com/bent_pyramid.htm
Carl Munck
Provides background information about the rhomboidal pyramid and why it was built using this shape.
( http://www.pyramidmatrix.com/bent_pyramid.htm )

http://www.narmer.pl/pir/snofru_en.htm
Darius Sitek
Scroll down for dimensions of the Bent Pyramid at Dahshur.
( http://www.narmer.pl/pir/snofru_en.htm )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #3 - Nets of a truncated icosahedron (soccer ball)
G. Korthals Altes
Scroll down for two versions of nets of a soccer ball. The PDF version is better.
( http://www.korthalsaltes.com/football.html )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #3 - The buckyball and truncated icosahedrons

http://www.seed.slb.com/en/scictr/lab/buckyball/index.htm
Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development (SEED)
Provides information about the buckyball. Provides instructions for building a paper model of a truncated icosahedron.
( http://www.seed.slb.com/en/scictr/lab/buckyball/index.htm )

http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=217
Karl Harrison
Provides information about a buckyball molecule. Allows users to interact with a 3-D model.
( http://www.3dchem.com/molecules.asp?ID=217 )

http://www.chem.wisc.edu/~newtrad/CurrRef/BDGTopic/BDGtext/bmmbas.html
Malcolm W. Browne New York Times
Provides information about the applications of the buckyball molecule in chemistry.
( http://www.chem.wisc.edu/~newtrad/CurrRef/BDGTopic/BDGtext/bmmbas.html )

Three-Dimensional Figures Project #4 - Photograph of a step pyramid
Official site of Dr. Zahi Hawass
Shows a photo of the Step Pyramid at Saqqara.
( http://www.guardians.net/hawass/Press%20Releases/laser_survey_step_pyramid.htm )

Probability Project #2 - How to choose which type of graph to use
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
Provides a tutorial about which types of graphs to use to display certain types of data.
( http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/help/user_guide/graph/whentouse.asp )

Tessellations Project #1 - Picture gallery featuring M. C. Escher’s works
Official Site of M.C. Escher
Provides links to view some of M. C. Escher’s works, including Sky and Water.
( http://www.mcescher.com/Gallery/gallery-switz.htm )

Tessellations Project #2 - Tessellating a plane
The Math Forum: Drexel University
Defines tessellations. Provides ideas on creating shapes that will tessellate the plane.
( http://mathforum.org/sum95/suzanne/whattess.html )











Succeed In Math

Do you want to do better in math? We have some suggestions that will help you.


Tips for Students
Why Studying Math is Different
Take Charge and Take Action
Preparing for Tests

Why Studying Math is Different

· Reading a math text is not like reading a novel. You may have to stop and think about some lines before proceeding.

· Math is a cumulative subject. If you miss a concept one day, it may come back to haunt you and could even prevent you from understanding concepts you study later. Always get help as soon as you recognize that you have a problem.

· Build up a network of math partners you can consult if you run into a roadblock. These are the days of easy communication. Telephone, email, and instant messaging are all available. Use them.

Take Charge and Take Action

· Take responsibility for your own success. If you find that you don't know or understand something, take whatever steps are necessary to fix the problem. Do not let others distract you from your purpose.

· Be an active participant in the classroom. Volunteer answers to questions and offer to place solutions on the blackboard. Ask questions immediately when you think you have lost the thread of the lesson.

· Math is learned by doing problems. Although you need to know some facts and procedures, you get really good at math by working through problems. It's wise to work on a problem yourself as much as possible. You may need to ask for help at some point, but don't give up too easily. The more you can do on your own, the more your brain will develop and the easier future problems will seem.

· Problem-solving is one of the key skills in the study of math. There are tips for problem-solving starting on page xiii in the front of MathLinks 8. Your teacher will show you additional strategies that you can use. In short, the steps are:
      – Understand the problem.
      – Plan how to solve it.
      – Do It! Carry out your plan.
      – Look Back. Review how you solved the problem and the answer you received. Does it make sense? If the answer seems unreasonable, it may be necessary to look for errors or select another strategy.

· Before beginning an assignment, review your class notes. Ensure that you understand the worked examples and the meaning of any new terms. Consider highlighting important concepts, equations, or definitions.

· As you work on each chapter, use the Foldables™ idea at the beginning of that chapter to keep track of information from the chapter, including Key Words, examples, Key Ideas, and what you need to work on.

· If you have completed the assigned problems, but still don't feel comfortable with the concepts, do a few more. Most teachers will assign about half of the problems in a given exercise. If you run out of practice questions before you feel comfortable with the concepts, ask the teacher for more. This Student Centre section of the MathLinks 8 Online Learning Centre has many things to help you.

· If you find that you need some help or a hint to proceed with the solution to a problem, be careful not to get too much help. You want a coach, not a handout. Once you see where to go, thank your coach. Don't ask for the entire solution. That robs you of an important learning opportunity.

· You have not failed at solving a question until you quit. Sometimes it is useful to skip a tricky question after thinking about it for a few minutes and then come back to it later.

· If there is any reason why you cannot finish your entire math assignment, it is better to do a few problems from each part than to do just the first problems in the assignment.

· If the homework load is light on a given day, use the extra time to review and practise concepts covered earlier in the course.

· Allow a few minutes at the end of your math work session to have a look at the next lesson so that you know what is coming up. It isn't necessary to work through the lesson, just to get a feeling for what is going to happen in the next math class.

Preparing for Tests

· If you do your homework conscientiously and work at fixing problems as they occur, then preparing for tests becomes much easier. All you need to do is remind yourself of the concepts that you are going to be tested on and do some sample problems to sharpen up your skills.

· When you receive your test, take a minute or two to look it over. You don't have to do question #1 first. If you see that you know how to attack question #3, then do that one first.

· Don't get bogged down on a question. If your strategy doesn't seem to be working and you are stuck for an alternative, go on to another question.

· Sometimes you will not finish a test in the time allotted. If this seems to be happening, do not panic. Accept that you are not going to finish. Make it your goal to do as many questions as you can before the time runs out.

· Read each question carefully. Be sure that you answer what was asked.

· Be sure to show your work. If you make an error and arrive at the wrong answer, you will at least get partial marks.

· If you have time left, use it to verify your answers. You can sometimes work backwards to do this. Alternatively, you can solve the same question a different way. Be sure to check calculations. A slip of the finger on a calculator can easily lead to a wrong answer.


· Watch out for panic attacks or "freezeups". This occasionally happens to many students on a test. Time may be short, solutions are not going well, and you have an overwhelming sense of panic. The best thing to do is STOP. Turn the test over on your desk. Take several deep breaths, exhaling slowly. Remind yourself that you prepared for this test and that you can do most, probably all, of the questions on it. Then, return to the test, select a question that you can do, and work through it.

· If panic becomes a serious problem, consider learning one or more relaxation techniques or consulting a counsellor for other strategies. Keep in mind that these will not help if the real source of the panic is inadequate preparation for the test.





Web Games


Place It!

http://www.mathsisfun.com/games/place-it.html

This two-dimensional geometry game called Place It! tests your spatial sense by requiring you to assemble a square from odd-shaped pieces. The number of pieces can be varied to adjust the difficulty of the game. Players play against the clock to determine winners and losers.
( http://www.mathsisfun.com/games/place-it.html )
Mathematics and Computation: The Hydra Game

http://math.andrej.com/2008/02/02/the-hydra-game/

Based on the creature from Greek mythology with many heads, the hydra, this is sometimes billed as “the game you can’t lose”. Although this claim refers only to the fact that every variation of the game has a solution, there is a fair amount of strategy involved in determining the solution in a minimum number of steps, allowing for competition among players. Winning strategies require good number sense, and will sharpen your numerical skills.
( http://math.andrej.com/2008/02/02/the-hydra-game/ )
Let’s Make a Deal

http://math.ucsd.edu/~crypto/Monty/monty.html

Based on a popular television program, Let’s Make a Deal requires you to make a selection, and then, decide whether to switch your selection based on information provided by the computer. The strategy that helps you to win is based on probability, and can be deduced using tools that you learn in this course.
( http://math.ucsd.edu/~crypto/Monty/monty.html )
Playing With JAVA: The Chomp Game

http://lpcs.math.msu.su/~pentus/abacus.htm

In an unusual twist, the first step in The Chomp Game requires you to deduce the rules. Once you have done so, you can play the game. Any number can play.
( http://lpcs.math.msu.su/~pentus/abacus.htm )
Linear Lasers

http://mathforum.org/te/exchange/hosted/linearlasers/

Polish your skills at visualizing linear relations in the context of a game. Given two targets, you must correctly construct the linear equation that will hit both targets.
( http://mathforum.org/te/exchange/hosted/linearlasers/ )
Factor Game

http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=12

Need some practice before tackling fraction operations? The Factor Game allows two players to compete against each other while brushing up on factoring skills needed for a variety of mathematics topics, including fraction operations. You can also play against the computer.
( http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=12 )
The All New & Improved Fruit Game!

http://www.2020tech.com/fruit/index.html

The Fruit Game is an interactive Nim-type game. Several kinds of fruit are placed on the table. You may go first, or tell the computer to go first. You, or the computer, “eat” as many of one kind of fruit as you like per turn. The object is to beat the computer by removing the last piece of fruit from the table.
( http://www.2020tech.com/fruit/index.html )


Hammurabi–Long Live the King!

http://maddrio.com/hammurabi/hammurabi.php

Hammurabi is a game based on the Babylonian King, Hammurabi who is credited with the first code of law. You are placed in charge of the kingdom for ten years and must make economic decisions each year of your reign. The computer calculates the results of your decisions, along with some random factors that you cannot control. The objective is to end your reign with the kingdom in a better state than when you started.
( http://maddrio.com/hammurabi/hammurabi.php )

The Chaos Game

http://math.bu.edu/DYSYS/applets/chaos-game.html

The Chaos Game makes use of the Sierpinski Triangle and some of the Chaos Theory behind the generation of fractals to present a challenging puzzle. There are four levels of difficulty provided.
( http://math.bu.edu/DYSYS/applets/chaos-game.html )
What is the Game of Life?

http://www.math.com/students/wonders/life/life.html

The Game of Life uses biological growth patterns as well as mathematical patterning to create a simulation of the growth or death of a culture. There are several rules for survival, which you can mix and match. The object is to create a living system that is able to sustain itself.
( http://www.math.com/students/wonders/life/life.html )
Hex-7

http://www.mazeworks.com/hex7/index.htm

Hex-7 is a strategy game that requires players to build a path across a playing surface made up of hexagons. You play against the computer and have the choice of first or second move. The game is offered at novice and advanced levels.
( http://www.mazeworks.com/hex7/index.htm )
Hare and Hounds

http://www.math.com/students/puzzles/hare/hare.html

Hare and Hounds is a strategy game that was popular among military officers in France during the 1800s. You can select hare or hounds. The hare must elude the hounds and escape. The hounds must trap the hare so that it cannot move. The game is offered at beginner and advanced levels.
( http://www.math.com/students/puzzles/hare/hare.html )

Hidden Picture

http://www.aplusmath.com/cgi-bin/games/geopicture

This is a variation of a memory game. You must correctly identify geometric terms to reveal pieces of a hidden picture. Several pictures are available.
( http://www.aplusmath.com/cgi-bin/games/geopicture )

Rubik Unbound

http://www.javaonthebrain.com/java/rubik/

The applet allows you to manipulate a Rubik’s cube in three dimensions. The applet will randomly scramble the cube for you.
( http://www.javaonthebrain.com/java/rubik/ )
Gomoku Board Game Online

http://www.checkers.ws/board_games/gomoku/gomoku_online.htm

Gomoku is a version of Tic Tac Toe that is played on an infinite game space and requires the winner to get five spheres in a row. You play against the computer. The game board can be resized.
( http://www.checkers.ws/board_games/gomoku/gomoku_online.htm )
Web Sudoku

http://www.websudoku.com/

Sudoku is a classic numbers game that requires you to complete a puzzle using the integers 1 to 9. Once you have mastered the Easy level, you can proceed through Medium and Hard to Evil levels.
( http://www.websudoku.com/ )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 1 Representing Data
Yes or No


The 450 students at Ridgeway High School were each given a questionnaire to choose the act that would be booked for the next assembly.


<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_001.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (10.0K)</a>

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_002.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (2.0K)</a>

Each student was asked to circle one answer for each question and to choose only one first-choice act. Some students did not follow instructions and chose two first-choice acts.

When the results were tallied, there were 220 yes answers for the magician, 180 yes answers for the acrobats, and 100 yes answers for the comedian. How many students chose two first-choice acts? How many of the students chose one first-choice act?


Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Line ’Em Up (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
• small counters in a different colour per player
• one eight-sided die and one twelve-sided die
BLM: Line ’Em Up (30.0K)

1. Print the game board on BLM: Line ’Em Up.

2. Distribute counters to each player.

3. The first player rolls the twelve-sided die to determine an x-coordinate and then the eight-sided die to determine a y-coordinate. The player places the counter on the appropriate point on the playing board.

4. Play moves to the next player who rolls the dice and places a counter on the game board. Play continues clockwise.

Note: More than one counter may occupy a point on the playing board. If this happens, stack the counters on the point.

5. Players continue rolling the dice until the end of the round. The round ends when a player has three counters that show a linear relationship, forming a straight line diagonally, horizontally, or vertically.

6. The first player to identify the linear relationship wins the round and receives 1 point. The counters are cleared off the board for the next round. Play continues for as many rounds as players wish.

7. The winner is the player with the highest number of points.








Student Games 2

Line ’Em Up (2–4 Players)
Materials Needed:
• small counters in a different colour per player
• one eight-sided die and one twelve-sided die
BLM: Line ’Em Up (19.0K)


1. Print the game board on BLM: Line ’Em Up.

2. Distribute counters to each player.

3. The first player rolls the twelve-sided die to determine an x-coordinate and then the eight-sided die to determine a y-coordinate. The player places the counter on the appropriate point on the playing board.

4. Play moves to the next player who rolls the dice and places a counter on the game board. Play continues clockwise.

    Note: More than one counter may occupy a point on the playing board. If this happens, stack the counters on the point.

5. Players continue rolling the dice until the end of the round. The round ends when a player has three counters that show a linear relationship, forming a straight line diagonally, horizontally, or vertically.

6. The first player to identify the linear relationship wins the round and receives 1 point. The counters are cleared off the board for the next round. Play continues for as many rounds as players wish.

7. The winner is the player with the highest number of points.

Web Links


USATODAY.com
Provides data about the 20 top-selling digital tracks with their corresponding rank on the year-end national airplay and mastertone charts.
( http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/2007-01-04-music-sales-side_x.htm )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 2 Ratios, Rates, and Proportional Reasoning
Father and Son


Today, Mr. Morgan is twice as old as his nephew. Twenty-five years ago, the ratio of their ages was 3 : 1. When will Mr. Morgan be 100 years old?


Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.






Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

At Any Ratio (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
• deck of playing cards
• two twelve-sided dice

1. Remove the kings from the deck of cards. One player deals the remaining cards equally to each player.
• Aces represent 1s, jacks represent 11s, and queens represent 12s.
• Other cards represent their face numbers.

2. Each player begins with 10 points. Each player rolls one die to decide who will play first. The player with the highest roll goes first. If there is a tie, roll again.

3. The first player rolls the two dice and determines the ratio between the two numbers rolled. The player looks for cards in his or her hand that form an equivalent ratio in lowest terms. Any cards that show the same ratio in lowest terms are placed on the table.

Example: Sunita rolls the ratio 8 : 12. She has a 2 and a 3 in her hand. This is the ratio of 8 : 12 expressed in lowest terms. She puts the 2 and the 3 on the table.

4. The other players check the cards on the table. If the ratio is correct and is in lowest terms, the player is awarded 1 point. If the ratio is incorrect, or is not in lowest terms, the player loses 1 point.

5. Play moves to the next player. Play ends when one player runs out of cards or after an agreed upon time limit. The winner is the player with the most points at the end of the game.








Student Games 2

At Any Ratio (2–4 Players)
Materials Needed:
• deck of playing cards
• two twelve-sided dice



1. Remove the kings from the deck of cards. One player deals the remaining cards equally to each player.
    • Aces represent 1s, jacks represent 11s, and queens represent 12s.
    • Other cards represent their face numbers.

2. Each player begins with 10 points. Each player rolls one die to decide who will play first. The player with the highest roll goes first. If there is a tie, roll again.

3. The first player rolls the two dice and determines the ratio between the two numbers rolled. The player looks for cards in his or her hand that form an equivalent ratio in lowest terms. Any cards that show the same ratio in lowest terms are placed on the table.

    Example: Sunita rolls the ratio 8 : 12. She has a 2 and a 3 in her hand. This is the ratio of 8 : 12 expressed in lowest terms. She puts the 2 and the 3 on the table.

4. The other players check the cards on the table. If the ratio is correct and is in lowest terms, the player is awarded 1 point. If the ratio is incorrect, or is not in lowest terms, the player loses 1 point.

5. Play moves to the next player. Play ends when one player runs out of cards or after an agreed upon time limit. The winner is the player with the most points at the end of the game.

Web Links


SE page 45
Information about Folklorama®


Folk Arts Council of Winnipeg

Provides news articles and a calendar of events.
( http://www.folklorama.ca/ )
SE page 53
Practise solving ratio problems


National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Provides several ratio problems.
( http://www.figurethis.org/challenges/c25/challenge.htm )
SE page 54
Information about the golden ratio in nature, architecture, art, poetry, and music


Oracle Education Foundation

Information and visuals about the golden ratio in architecture including The Parthenon and the Great Pyramids of Giza.

(http://library.thinkquest.org/trio/TTQ05063/phibeauty4.htm)

University of Georgia

This site was developed by J. Wilson. Information about the golden ratio including a brief history, definitions, golden geometry, and the golden ratio in art and architecture.
( http://jwilson.coe.uga.edu/EMT668/EMAT6680.2000/Obara/Emat6690/Golden%20Ratio/golden.html )
Department of Mathematics, Surrey University, Guildford, UK

This site was developed by R. Knott. Information about the golden ratio in architecture, art, and music. Includes a Things to Do investigation about logos that are golden rectangles and numerous active links.
( http://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibInArt.html )
SE page 73
International food recipes


CooksRecipes.com

Provides recipes by category and by country or region.
( http://www.cooksrecipes.com/category/international.html )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 3 Pythagorean Relationship
Paper Roll


A cardboard cylinder has a circumference of 12 cm and a length of 20 cm. Ranjeet started at the top of the roll and drew a line all the way around the roll. He completed four turns before reaching the bottom, as shown in the picture. How long was the line that Ranjeet drew?


<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/505858/image006.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (5.0K)</a>

Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Square Cuts (Any Number of Players)

Materials Needed:
• sheet of paper per player
• ruler per player
• scissors per pair of players
• coloured pencils
• timer

1. On a sheet of paper, each player draws a right triangle of any size. A square is drawn on each of the two sides and the hypotenuse of the triangle. The squares are cut out and the right triangle is set aside.

2. Divide each square into five shapes by drawing straight lines. Each shape is coloured such that no two touching shapes are the same colour.

3. Cut out the coloured shapes by cutting along the lines, mix up the shapes, and pass the shapes to the player on the right.

4. Start the timer. Each player needs to reassemble the shapes back into the original squares such that the squares form the sides of a right triangle. Each player records the time it took to reassemble the original squares. Stop the timer when all players are done.

5. The score for each player is 300 – t, where t is the time required to reassemble the shapes, in seconds.

6. The winner is the player with the highest score.








Student Games 2

Square Cuts (Any Number of Players)
Materials Needed:
• sheet of paper per player
• ruler per player
• scissors per pair of players
• coloured pencils
• timer



1. On a sheet of paper, each player draws a right triangle of any size. A square is drawn on each of the two sides and the hypotenuse of the triangle. The squares are cut out and the right triangle is set aside.

2. Divide each square into five shapes by drawing straight lines. Each shape is coloured such that no two touching shapes are the same colour.

3. Cut out the coloured shapes by cutting along the lines, mix up the shapes, and pass the shapes to the player on the right.

4. Start the timer. Each player needs to reassemble the shapes back into the original squares such that the squares form the sides of a right triangle. Each player records the time it took to reassemble the original squares. Stop the timer when all players are done.

5. The score for each player is 300 – t, where t is the time required to reassemble the shapes, in seconds.

6. The winner is the player with the highest score.

Web Links


SE page 79
Information about the game of Playing Leader


NativeTech

Native American Technology and Art Provides a description and a visual of the game.
( http://www.nativetech.org/games/boardgames.html )
SE page 91
Explore the Pythagorean relationship


Mission: Algebra

Explore nine interactive proofs for the Pythagorean Theorem.
( http://www.ies.co.jp/math/java/geo/pythagoras.html )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 4 Understanding Percent
Ping Pong Challenge


Sandy’s Sports Shop offered its customers a chance to win a new bicycle by guessing how many ping pong balls were in a large jar. Andy guessed 150. Bea guessed 20% higher than Andy. Denys guessed 25% higher than Bea. Emma guessed 20% lower than Denys. Francesca guessed 10% lower Emma. Chandra guessed 50% higher than Francesca. Chandra guessed correctly and won the bicycle. How many ping pong balls were in the jar?


Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Nail the Percent (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
• two paper clips
• two pencils
• timer
• calculator
BLM: Spinners (33.0K)

1. Print and cut out the spinners on BLM: Spinners. Use the paper clips and pencils to complete the spinners.

2. The first player spins both spinners. The player to the left starts the timer.

3. The first player places the smallest number spun over the largest number to form a fraction. If the numbers are equal, place either one over the other. If two zeroes are spun, the player receives 5 points, and play moves to the next player.

4. The player has 10 s to estimate the percent that is equivalent to the fraction. Points are awarded according to the table.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_017.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (1.0K)</a>

Example: The fraction is <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_002.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a>. The player estimates the equivalent percent is 39%. The player uses the calculator to check the correct answer of 37.5%. The player receives 1 point for the answer since it is within 2% of the correct answer.

5. Play moves to the next player. The player to the left is the timer.

6. End the game after 20 rounds. The winner is the player with the highest score.








Student Games 2

Nail the Percent (2–4 Players)
Materials Needed:
• two paper clips
• two pencils
• timer
• calculator
BLM: Spinners (21.0K)



1. Print and cut out the spinners on BLM: Spinners. Use the paper clips and pencils to complete the spinners.

2. The first player spins both spinners. The player to the left starts the timer.

3. The first player places the smallest number spun over the largest number to form a fraction. If the numbers are equal, place either one over the other. If two zeroes are spun, the player receives 5 points, and play moves to the next player.

4. The player has 10 s to estimate the percent that is equivalent to the fraction. Points are awarded according to the table.

    Example: The fraction is . The player estimates the equivalent percent is 39%. The player uses the calculator to check the correct answer of 37.5%. The player receives 1 point for the answer since it is within 2% of the correct answer.

5. Play moves to the next player. The player to the left is the timer.

6. End the game after 20 rounds. The winner is the player with the highest score.

Web Links


SE page 143
Data and tips about conserving water


American Water Works Association
Provides conservation tips at home. From the list on the left, click on Conservation Outside for outdoor conservation tips and click on Water Use Statistics for data about water use.
( http://www.drinktap.org/consumerdnn/Default.aspx?tabid=83 )
SE page 145
PST rates by province


Taxtips.ca
Provides information about PST rates by province or territory. Use the active links for more information about provinces that charge PST.
( http://www.taxtips.ca/pst/pstrates.htm )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 5 Surface Area
The Round Table


The Fung family eats dinner at a circular table that has an area of 20 096 cm2. They have invited several friends to dinner and need to double the area of the table to fit all of their guests. The table opens in the middle to allow rectangular leaves to be added. Each leaf is 30 cm wide and fits across the diameter of the table. What is the minimum number of leaves needed?


Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Para Lelli Pipe Ed (Pairs of Players)

Materials Needed:
• scissors
• tape
• timer
Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper (453.0K)

Note: A parallelepiped is a six-sided figure with opposite sides parallel. A box is a parallelepiped with right-angled corners.

1. Print a copy of Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper for each player.

2. Pairs of players choose a value for the surface area of a box that can be made using the grid paper, and tell their partner.

3. Start the timer. Working at the same time, the players have 5 min to
• draw, cut out, and fold a box with the surface area chosen by their partner
• prove that it is not possible to create a box with that surface area using the grid paper

4. At the end of 5 min, or earlier if both players agree, check the results. A player is awarded 1 point for a box that has been made correctly or for a valid argument that explains why it is not possible to make the box.

5. Play continues for as many rounds as players wish. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the game.








Student Games 2

Para Lelli Pipe Ed (Pairs of Players)
Materials Needed:
• scissors
• tape
• timer
Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper (24.0K)

Note: A parallelepiped is a six-sided figure with opposite sides parallel. A box is a parallelepiped with right-angled corners.


1. Print a copy of Master 8 Centimetre Grid Paper for each player.

2. Pairs of players choose a value for the surface area of a box that can be made using the grid paper, and tell their partner.

3. Start the timer. Working at the same time, the players have 5 min to
    • draw, cut out, and fold a box with the surface area chosen by their partner
    • prove that it is not possible to create a box with that surface area using the grid paper

4. At the end of 5 min, or earlier if both players agree, check the results. A player is awarded 1 point for a box that has been made correctly or for a valid argument that explains why it is not possible to make the box.

5. Play continues for as many rounds as players wish. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the game.

Web Links

None

Brain Teaser

Chapter 6 Fraction Operations
Dartboard

A dartboard has five concentric circles. The centre circle has a value of 1, the next ring has a value of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_004.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> , the third has a value of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_005.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> , the fourth a value of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_006.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> , and the final, outer ring a value of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_007.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> . Rafael threw four darts and scored a total of <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_teaser_008.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> . Where did his darts land?



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Clear the Fractions (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
BLM: Fraction Cards (84.0K)

1. Print and cut out the fraction cards on BLM: Fraction Cards.

2. Shuffle and deal eight fraction cards to each player. Place the rest face down in a pile.

3. Players inspect and arrange their cards. The object is to find groups of three fractions that are related by addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division.

Example: <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_006.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a>  or  <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_015.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> Note: The Wild Card may take on any fractional value between 0 and 1.

4. The first player examines the cards for as many groups of three cards as possible, and then places the groups on the table. If there are cards remaining in his or her hand, the player draws a card from the pile and the turn is over. Play moves to the next player on the left.

5. Play ends when
• all the cards have been drawn from the pile, or
• a player is able to place all of his or her cards on the table

6. The score for each player is 20 – n, where n is the number of cards remaining in a player’s hand at the end of the game.








Student Games 2


Clear the Fractions (2–4 Players)
Materials Needed:

1. Print and cut out the fraction cards on BLM: Fraction Cards.

2. Shuffle and deal eight fraction cards to each player. Place the rest face down in a pile.

3. Players inspect and arrange their cards. The object is to find groups of three fractions that are related by addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division.

    Note: The Wild Card may take on any fractional value between 0 and 1.

4. The first player examines the cards for as many groups of three cards as possible, and then places the groups on the table. If there are cards remaining in his or her hand, the player draws a card from the pile and the turn is over. Play moves to the next player on the left.

5. Play ends when
    • all the cards have been drawn from the pile, or
    • a player is able to place all of his or her cards on the table

6. The score for each player is 20 – n, where n is the number of cards remaining in a player’s hand at the end of the game.

Web Links


SE page 216
Information about provincial and territorial flags


Flags of the World

Provides an image and an overview of each provincial and territorial flag. Click on Protocol Order of Provincial/Territorial Flags and then click on each province or territory in the list.
( http://flagspot.net/flags/ca_prtcl.html )
Worldflags101.com

Provides an image and information about the ratio of the width to the length of each flag. From the list on the left, click on each provincial or territorial flag.
( http://www.worldflags101.com/canada/alberta.aspx )
SE page 231
Information about Canada’s gold rushes and the life of Keish


Virtual Museum Canada

Profiles gold rush photographers who captured images that portray aspects of life in the Yukon during the Klondike Gold Rush. From the list on the right, click on Larss and Duclos for a portrait of Keish.
( http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Goldrushphoto/02english/02intro.html )
Parks Canada

The National Historic Sites of Canada in the Klondike Provides information about the Klondike Gold Rush.
( http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/yt/klondike/index_e.asp )
Barkerville Historic Town

From the list on the left, click on The History for historical information about Barkerville, the Gold Capital of British Columbia. Site also features information about local attractions and stage shows that re-enact the history of the region.
( http://www.barkerville.ca/newindex/index03.html )
Virtual Museum Canada

Play the interactive Cariboo Gold Rush Adventure Game to find out more about the people, places, and events in the Cariboo Gold Rush of the 1860s.
(http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/Search.do?Ne=8647&lang=en&N=8249+8100+4294224481&ex=on&Qo=6)
BC Heritage

Features resources about the Cariboo Gold Rush. Trace the Overlanders journey to the Cariboo Gold Rush. Check out primary source material from BC Archives, which includes journals, letters, and memoirs of the Cariboo Gold Rush era.
( http://bcheritage.ca/cariboo/contents.htm )
The Centre for Canadian Studies at Mount Allison University

Features the history of the Canadian North West Mounted Police and their role in the Yukon Gold Rush.

(http://www.mta.ca/faculty/arts/canadian_studies/)

SE page 239
Canada’s ecozones


Evergreen

Provides an introduction to Canada’s ecozones. On the map, click on each individual ecozone to learn more.

(http://www.evergreen.ca/en/resources/native-plants/canada-ecozones.sn#prairies)

Brain Teaser

Chapter 7 Volume
Books for Africa


<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/505858/image032.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (9.0K)</a>

Rayyan collected used books to send to a library in Africa. The books she collected are:
• 10 large hardcover books, each measuring 40 cm by 30 cm by 5 cm
• 20 smaller hardcover books, each measuring 30 cm by 20 cm by 4 cm
• 30 paperback books, each measuring 20 cm by 12 cm by 3 cm
The post office sold cube-shaped boxes starting with a side length of 20 cm and increasing by 5 cm to a maximum of 75 cm. Estimate the side length of the smallest cube-shaped box that could hold all of the books. Why is it just an estimate?


Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

The Prism Grill (3 or More Players)

Materials Needed:
• one 12-sided die
• pencil and paper
• calculator for checking calculations
• timer

1. Players form a circular arrangement around a playing table and agree to a time limit, such as 20 min, for the game.

2. Player 1 rolls the die three times and notes the number that comes up each time. These numbers represent the base, height, and length of a right triangular prism.

3. After the third roll,
• Player 1 uses pencil and paper to calculate the volume of the prism
• Player 2 begins timing

4. As soon as Player 1 has an answer,
• Player 2 stops timing and notes the elapsed time, t, in seconds
• Player 3 checks the calculation and pronounces whether the answer is correct or not

5. Players receive <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_008.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> points, rounded upwards to the nearest integer for a correct answer. Players receive no points for an incorrect answer.

6. Play passes to Player 2. Player 3 times and Player 4 checks the answer.

7. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the time limit.

Possible Variation:
Roll the die twice. Let the numbers represent the radius and height of a right cylinder.








Student Games 2

The Prism Grill (3 or More Players)
Materials Needed:
• one 12-sided die
• pencil and paper
• calculator for checking calculations
• timer



1. Players form a circular arrangement around a playing table and agree to a time limit, such as 20 min, for the game.

2. Player 1 rolls the die three times and notes the number that comes up each time. These numbers represent the base, height, and length of a right triangular prism.

3. After the third roll,
    • Player 1 uses pencil and paper to calculate the volume of the prism
    • Player 2 begins timing


Web Links


SE page 252
The International Space Station


NASA
Provides information about the International Space Station. Click on active links for Interactives, ISS Science, Related Links, and Station Imagery.
( http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/ )
SE page 266
The Canadarm


The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System: The Canadarm
Provides information, a diagram, and photos of the Canadarm.
( http://www.ewh.ieee.org/reg/7/millennium/canadarm/canadarm_technical.html )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 8 Integers
Convenience Store


Marlon went to a convenience store and selected a package of granola bars for $3.16. He then added three other tax-free items to his basket. The total of all four items was $7.11. The clerk used a calculator to determine the total to be $7.11 also. Later, when Marlon checked the receipt, he noticed that the clerk had multiplied, rather than added, the four prices. What were the four prices?



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Zero to Hero (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
• deck of playing cards

1. Remove the jacks, queens, kings, and jokers from the deck of cards.
• Aces count as 1s.
• Red cards are positive.
• Black cards are negative.

2. Take turns dealing the cards. Shuffle the cards and deal each player six cards. Place the remaining cards face down in a pile.

3. The object of the game is to assemble groups of cards that add to zero. There is no limit to the number of cards in a group, as long as the sum is zero.

4. The first player lays down a group of cards that add to zero, if there is one. If there are cards remaining in his or her hand, the player draws a card from the pile. Play passes to the next player to the left.

5. The round ends when all the cards in the pile have been drawn or a player has no more cards in his or her hand.

6. The score for each player is the sum of the value of the cards remaining in his/her hand. For the score, count all of the cards as positive. The winner is the player with the lowest score.

7. Play may proceed for as many rounds as the players wish. Keep a running total of the scores.








Web Links


SE page 302
Information about Aboriginal sources of Canadian place names


Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Lists Aboriginal sources of Canada’s names of some provinces and territories and larger towns and cities.

(http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100016346/1100100016350)

Wikipedia®

Provides information about Aboriginal sources of Canada’s names of some provinces and territories and larger towns and cities. From the Contents list, click on active links for Provinces and Territories and then individual provinces and territories.
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_place_names_in_Canada_of_Aboriginal_origin )
SE page 313
Information about the Ben Franklin and ROPOS submersibles


SUB-FIND.com

Includes a photo, a diagram, and information about the Ben Franklin.
( http://www.sub-find.com/historical.htm )
NASA

This site was developed in support of collaborations with a number of educational activities. Provides links to information about the Ben Franklin.
( http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/FRANKLIN/HTML/franklin_links.html )
Vancouver Maritime Museum

Provides multimedia information about the Ben Franklin. From the list on the left, choose Virtual Tours and click on Ben Franklin. Choose from active links to History, Tour, Game, and Video.
( http://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com/ )
ROPOS.com

Provides information about ROPOS submersibles.
( http://www.ropos.com )
SE page 317
Information about the modern pentathlon including the scoring system


Canadian Modern Pentathlon Association

Provides information about the pentathlon. For information about the scoring system for each event, click on shoot, fence. swim, ride, and run.
( http://www.pentathloncanada.ca )
Modern-Pentathlon.com

Includes information about the pentathlon and the scoring system for each event.
( http://www.modern-pentathlon.com )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 9 Linear Relations
Cryptic Coffee


The Code and Cypher Club meets at a different café each month. The coded location for this month’s meeting is CWAEU WQWQ. To encode the name of the café, the president of the club used the relation y = 2x – 1, where x is a number that represents a letter in the alphabet, and y is a number that represents the coded letter. What is the name of the café?



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.


Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

It’s in the Cards (Pairs of Players)

Materials Needed:
• die
• timer
BLM: Linear Relation Cards (28.0K)

1. Print and cut out the cards on BLM: Linear Relation Cards. Shuffle and deal all of the cards to the two players.

2. Player 1 selects one of his or her cards and places it on the table. Player 2 rolls the die. The number represents a value of x.

3. Player 1 starts the timer. Player 2 has 10 s to determine the value of y by substituting the x-value into the linear relation on the card.

4. If the y-value is correct, Player 2 receives 5 points.

5. Play switches so that Player 2 selects a linear relation card and Player 1 rolls the die and solves for the y-value.

6. Play ends when all cards have been played. The winner is the player with the highest score.








Web Links


SE page 343
Practise graphing skills


Interactive Algebra
Provides graphing skills practice. Scroll down to Unit 3: Graphing. Try each of the four lessons.
( http://www.veazeys.com/math/lessons.htm )

Chapter 9: Linear Relations

When you go out bike riding with your friends, you know that the farther you ride, the more time it will take. This pattern between distance and time is an example of a linear relation. Learn more about linear relations as you navigate around this site.

Brain Teaser

Chapter 10 Solving Linear Equations
Baby Brothers


Three baby boys were born in 2007, each on the first day of a month. On January 1, 2008, Albert was one month less than three times Carl’s age. Babar was one month less than twice Carl’s age. The sum of the ages of the three boys was 22 months. How old was each boy on January 1, 2008?



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.


Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Flip and Roll (Pairs of Players)

Materials Needed:
• two dice of different colours
• one coin
• timer

1. Player 1 rolls the dice and flips the coin. Heads represents an addition sign and tails represents a subtraction sign.

2. Player 1 starts the timer. Player 2 constructs a linear equation using the operation sign from the coin flip and the number values of the rolled dice.
• The equation is x  <a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=gif::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_016.gif','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (0.0K)</a> number value of Die 1 = number value of Die 2.
Player 2 solves for the variable.

Example: x + 6 = 4
               x = –2

3. If the solution is correct, Player 2 receives 60 – t points, where t is the time taken to solve the problem, in seconds. If it takes more than 60 s to solve the problem, award a score of zero, even if the solution is correct.

4. Play continues with players switching roles.

5. The game continues for as many rounds as the players wish. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the game.








Web Links


SE page 379
A Silly Putty® recipe


About.com: Chemistry

Provides two Silly Putty® recipes.
( http://chemistry.about.com/od/everydaychemistry/a/sillyputty_2.htm )
SE page 381
Practise solving linear equations using a balance scale


National Library of Virtual Manipulatives

Solve linear equations using a virtual balance scale. Use problems developed by the computer or the user.
(http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_201_g_4_t_2.html?open=instructions&from=grade_g_4.html)

Brain Teaser

Chapter 11 Probability
Round Robin


Twelve schools have been invited to send their best badminton player to a “round robin” tournament. In the tournament, each player must play every other player once. What is the probability that the player from Lakeside School will play a game against the player from Forest View School in either the first or the last round?



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Free Throw Contest (Any Number of Players)

Materials Needed:
• three pieces of 8.5 × 11 cardboard
• counters or tokens for keeping score
• ten plastic balls of diameter 4 cm or less
BLM: Target Template (38.0K)

1. Print and cut out the templates on BLM: Target Template. Use each template to draw a target hole centered on a piece of cardboard. The target holes are 6 cm, 9 cm, and 12 cm in diameter.

2. Each player receives 15 counters or tokens. The first player pays 3 counters to enter the game.

3. The player selects any one of the three targets. The target is placed at a distance calculated using the formula: Distance = 20 × diameter of hole (in cm).

4. The player tosses ten balls at the target, one at a time. For each ball that goes through the hole, the player receives 1 counter.

5. The next player continues the game.

6. The game ends when
• one player runs out of counters, or
• one player has 50 or more counters
The winner is the player with the most counters.

7. Each player in a fair game has an equal chance of winning. Is this game fair? Explain.








Web Links


SE page 435
Try an on-line simulation


National Council of Teachers of Mathematics
Using a virtual spinner, change the number of sectors and increase or decrease their size to create any type of spinner. Follow the instructions to conduct a probability experiment by spinning the spinner many times. To start over, click New Experiment.
( http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=79 )

Brain Teaser

Chapter 12 Tessellations
Tessellations


Use all four shapes shown to tile the plane.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/505858/image042.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (7.0K)</a>



Click here for a hint

Click here for the solution


Note: Brain teasers are often open to more than one interpretation, and multiple answers may be possible. Sample solutions are shown.

Crossword Puzzle

Want a fun way to test your knowledge of math terms? Try this Crossword Puzzle and see how many you can get!








Student Games

Napoleon’s Triangles (2–4 Players)

Materials Needed:
• coloured pencils or markers
• scissors
BLM: Napoleon’s Triangles (88.0K)

1. Print a copy of BLM: Napoleon’s Triangles. Shade each set of triangles a different colour. Cut out the triangles.

2. Place the START triangle on a flat surface. See #1 in the diagram. Divide the remaining triangles randomly and equally among the players.

<a onclick="window.open('/./olcweb/cgi/pluginpop.cgi?it=jpg::::/./olc2/dl/505858/ml8_games_012.jpg','popWin', 'width=NaN,height=NaN,resizable,scrollbars');" href="#"><img valign="absmiddle" height="16" width="16" border="0" src="./olcweb/styles/shared/linkicons/image.gif"> (8.0K)</a>

3. The first player places a triangle adjacent to one side of the START triangle. See #2 in the diagram. Play moves to the next player.

4. The players continue to take turns and build a tiling pattern similar to that shown in #3 of the diagram.
Note: Two triangles of the same shape and size may not share a common side.

5. A player who cannot add a triangle skips a turn.

6. Play ends when
• no player can make an allowable play
• one player has used all of his or her triangles

7. The winner is the player with the fewest triangles left at the end of play.








Web Links


SE page 451
Generate tessellations on the computer


Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.
Generate a polygon that repeats without overlapping across a plane.
( http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/Tessellate/ )
SE page 460
Examples of pysankas


LearnPysanky.com
Provides examples of pysanka designs. Access enlargements of each design by clicking on the miniatures.
( http://www.learnpysanky.com/designs.html#beg )
SE page 465
Examples of Escher’s art


M.C. Escher: The Official Web Site
Click on Picture Gallery and choose Symmetry. Access enlargements of each design by clicking on the miniatures.
( http://www.mcescher.com/ )